Maintaining the health and safety of our patients, employees, and community is our top priority.  


To ensure social distancing to the best of our ability, we must limit the number of people in the office.  Drivers/family members will be asked to wait in their car.  We are happy to call them when the patient's appointment is completed. 

Patients must meet the following criteria:

  • Follow social distancing policies.
  • Wear a mask (unless unable to for medical reasons).
  • Have had no symptoms or exposure in the last 14 days.
  • Temperature of less than 100.0F.

 Mask Policy:

  • Patients and approved visitors must wear a mask
  • Masks must fully cover the nose and mouth.

Employee Screenings

All of our employees are screened before they are allowed to enter work each day.  This includes employees, providers, and vendors.

Glaucoma is an eye disease that is characterized by a sudden or gradual increase in pressure in the eye. Since it is mostly asymptomatic other than progressive vision loss, it’s important to get regular eye exams with our ophthalmologist to check for changes in your vision and to test the pressure in your eyes.

Glaucoma Eye Ball

Glaucoma Causes

Glaucoma is an eye disease that most often develops after the age of 60. It is believed to be hereditary, and there have been several genes identified that relate to the development of high internal eye pressure. The condition causes a buildup of fluid in the front part of the eye, which increases the pressure in the eye. When the pressure increases, it causes damage to the optic nerve.

Once this damage occurs, it cannot be reversed. Therefore, it is extremely important to get your eye pressure tested on a yearly basis by visiting {PRACTICENAME). This test is painless and relatively fast. It is either performed by blowing a puff of air into your eye or by touching a pen-like device to the front of your eye. If the latter test is used, numbing eye drops will be placed into your eyes in order to reduce discomfort.

Glaucoma Types and Symptoms

There are two types of glaucoma, including open-angle and closed-angle. In order to understand these two types, it’s important to understand how the fluid flows through the front of the eye. Your eyes create fluid that circulates internally. Once the circulation process is complete, it drains through an opening between the iris and cornea, called the trabecular meshwork. When the trabecular meshwork becomes partially or completely clogged, it results in higher than normal eye pressure.

Open-Angle

Most individuals have open-angle glaucoma. This occurs when the trabecular meshwork is partially blocked. The decreased flow of fluid results in a gradual increase in eye pressure. The increase is usually so slight that individuals can have significant vision loss before they realize there is a problem. There are typically no other symptoms associated with this form of the disease.

Closed-Angle

Closed-angle glaucoma typically occurs after open-angle glaucoma. This stage of the eye disease is characterized by the complete closure of the trabecular meshwork. The closed-angle form is much more dangerous and can be considered an emergency situation. If your vision suddenly becomes blurry, have a sudden severe headache, eye pain, nausea or halos or colors around lights, it is important to call our office immediately to prevent blindness.

Risk Factors for Increased Eye Pressure

  • 60 Years of Age or Older
  • Have a History of Eye Surgery
  • Have a Previous Eye Injury
  • Having Extreme Nearsightedness or Farsightedness
  • High Internal Eye Pressure
  • Other People in the Family Have High Eye Pressure

Treatments for High Intraocular Eye Pressure

Glaucoma can be treated, and the inner pressure in your eye can be reduced in order to prevent damage to your optic nerve. Common treatments include medications and/or laser eye surgery, Dr. Kunesh will determine what type of treatment is needed.

Eye Medications

The most common treatment used to reduce internal eye pressure is daily eye drops. These eye drops can either decrease the amount of fluid the eye produces, or they can increase the flow of fluid through the trabecular meshwork.

Laser Eye Surgery

If the eye drops fail to adequately reduce the internal pressure in the eye, laser eye surgery may be needed. This surgery involves either opening the trabecular meshwork or creating a very small hole in the iris to increase fluid drainage.

To schedule your next eye exam to have your vision tested and to check for signs and symptoms of glaucoma, call us today at (937) 298-1703.

Testimonials

Reviews From Our Satisfied Patients

  • Highly recommend this practice! I was in town visiting family and had an issue with my eye that worried me and needed to be checked.but couldn’t get in with another physician until later, and their reviews weren’t as high. I phoned Kunesh and was greeted by Julie, super pleasant on the phone and when I described my issue, she was very prompt in getting me an appointment. From the moment I arrived the staff was all busy working and multitasking. While I was filling out paperwork Elaine took

    ...
    Read More - Karen B.
  • If and when you have a retina tear, this is the place to go. I was seen on a Saturday and was the only patient. If you live long enough and are near sighted and see Northern lights inside call. You will be seen. Normally this is not a problem, but only an ophthalmologist can tell. To avoid the long wait take the earliest appointment offered. If not, it is definitely worth the wait. The optometrist is great, too, but must be requested. Their attention to detail is amazing! You will have drops, s

    ...
    Read More - Mary Z.
  • Warm and friendly, highly professional

    - Lalonne P.

Hours of Operation

Our Regular Schedule

Dayton Office

Monday

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Tuesday

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Wednesday

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Thursday

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Friday

8:00 am - 12:00 pm

Saturday

Closed

Sunday

Closed

Dayton Office

Monday
8:00 am - 5:00 pm
Tuesday
8:00 am - 5:00 pm
Wednesday
8:00 am - 5:00 pm
Thursday
8:00 am - 5:00 pm
Friday
8:00 am - 12:00 pm
Saturday
Closed
Sunday
Closed

Locations

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